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AN AMPLIFICATION OF LABOURS AIMS (1960)

[ See also the changes to the 1960 Rule Book ]

At its meeting on 13 July 1960 the National Executive Committee passed the following:

"The National Executive Committee resolves not to proceed with any amendment or addition to Clause IV of the Constitution, but declares that the statement which it adopted on 16 March is a valuable expression of the aims of the Labour Party in the second half of the twentieth century and commends it to the Conference accordingly."

The following statement adopted in 1960 reaffirms, amplifies and clarifies Party Objects in the light of post-war developments and the historic achievements of the first majority Labour Government. This means the Constitution remained intact but the following was added:

The British Labour Party is a democratic socialist party. Its central ideal is the brotherhood of man. Its purpose is to make this ideal a reality everywhere.

Accordingly:

(a) It rejects discrimination on grounds of race, colour or creed and holds that men should accord to one another equal consideration and status in recognition of the fundamental dignity of Man.

(b) Believing that no nation, whatever its size or power, is justified in dictating to or ruling over other countries against their will, it stands for the right of all peoples to freedom, independence and self-government.

(c) Recognising that international anarchy and the struggle for power between nations must lead to universal destruction, it seeks to build a world order within which all will live in peace. To this end it is pledged to respect the United Nations Charter, to renounce the use of armed force except in self-defence and to work unceasingly for world disarmament, the abolition of all nuclear weapons and the peaceful settlement of international disputes.

(d) Rejecting the economic exploitation of one country by another, it affirms the duty of richer nations to assist APPENDIX II poorer nations and to do all in their power to abolish poverty throughout the world.

(e) It stands for social justice, for a society in which the claims of those in hardship or distress come first; where the wealth produced by all is fairly shared among all; where differences in rewards depend not upon birth or inheritance but on the effort, skill and creative energy contributed to the common good; and where equal opportunities exist for all to live a full and varied life.

(f) Regarding the pursuit of material wealth by and for itself as empty and barren, it rejects the selfish, acquisitive doctrines of capitalism, and strives to create instead a socialist community based on fellowship, co-operation and service in which all can share fully in our cultural heritage.

(g) Its aim is a classless society from which all class barriers and false social values have been eliminated.

(h) It holds that to ensure full employment, rising production, stable prices and steadily advancing living standards the nation's economy should be planned and all concentrations of power subordinated to the interests of the community as a whole.

(i) It stands for democracy in industry, and for the right of workers both in the public and private sectors to full consultation in all the vital decisions of management, especially those affecting conditions of work.

(j) It is convinced that these social and economic objectives can be achieved only through an expansion of common ownership substantial enough to give the community power over the commanding heights of the economy. Common ownership takes varying forms, including state-owned industries and firms, producer and consumer co-operation, municipal ownership and public participation in private concerns. Recognising that both public and private enterprise have a place in the economy, it believes that further extension of common ownership should be decided from time to time in the light of these objectives and according to circumstances, with due regard for the views of the workers and consumers concerned.

(k) It stands for the happiness and freedom of the individual against the glorification of the state - for the protection of workers, consumers and all citizens against any exercise of arbitrary power, whether by the state, by private or by public authorities, and it will resist all forms of collective prejudice and intolerance.

(l) As a democratic Party believing that there is no true Socialism without political freedom, it seeks to obtain and to hold power only through free democratic institutions whose existence it has resolved always to strengthen and defend against all threats from any quarter. At its meeting on tgjuly 1960 the National Executive Committee passed the following: The National Executive Committee resolves not to proceed with any amendment or addition to Clause IV of the Constitution, but declares that the statement which it adopted on I 6 March is a valuable expression of the aims of the Labour Party in the second half of the twentieth century and commends it to the Conference accordingly.

End of piece:

This text of this above document is opened sourced within a PDF document which is indexed and can be retrieved at:

https://link.springer.com

A useful added perspective, looking back to the "Labour and Clause IV" before 1918 can be seen in summary here at:

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-349-03512-0_1

 

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